Saturday, December 26, 2015

Apparently, Some References To A Certain Central European Dictator Are More 'Hysterical' Than Others.

YouCan'tHideFacismUnderACombOver
OrAFauxLordshipVille


Mr. Conrad Black, in the linear type public print organ grinder monkey he once owned, on December 19, 2015:

The principal news about Donald Trump’s candidacy for the U.S. Republican presidential nomination is not the sometimes controversial things that he says, but the increasingly hysterical responses to him from the traditionally respectable political quarters that he discomforts. In this shrill political atmosphere, he is not the chief offender to civil standards of political discourse. Roger Cohen wrote in The New York Times last week, and he was reprinted in the National Post on Wednesday, that Trump was reminiscent of Hitler...


And, just three weeks earlier, here is the same Mr. Black, in the same fish wrap, writing about something else entirely (allegedly):

...(T)here is something very peculiar about a system that, as in the Duffy case, allows an RCMP corporal to publish such an inflammatory series of allegations against a distinguished figure of the private and public sector such as Nigel Wright. Corporals don't normally have such influence. (Contrary to malicious rumour, Napoleon was never a corporal; he was a cadet and then an officer. Hitler was a corporal, serving four years in combat in World War I and earning two Iron Crosses...



So, given all that...

Just in case you've forgotten.

Yes, Virginia, there once really was a 'Fitzmas'!


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4 comments:

e.a.f. said...

well I would conclude Black thinks only those of them in his social class should "judge" those in his social class. Might just work, if we were truly "judged" by our peers. Might reduce the number of First Nations people in jails. People with mental illness night not be in jail. And just so the "not so good lord tubby" knows, Canada is a democracy, and with that comes police forces, who get to investigate criminal activities or alleged criminal activities or get to investigate situations which might be criminal without any attention being paid to the financial status of the person being investigated.

Now we know why the Magna Carta is such an important document and why we need Charters of Rights and freedoms, so guys like lord tubby and his friends don't get away with crimes. yes, dear old nigel ought to be held to the same standard as anyone else in Canada and the person doing the investigating can be just a lowly corporal in the RCMP. so lord tubby and his ilk can forget about being investigated by Poulson, over dinner at the "club". Being able to say what you want, is called freedom of speech. if "lord tubby" doesn't get it, perhaps he might like to decamp Canada and go somewhere else.
Funny how he was so keen on renouncing his Canadian citizenship, but came back here, when he got out of jail. Should have shipped his ass to England.

RossK said...

Thanks for that 'e.a.f.'

I'm going to front it.


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mark mounce said...

I find it ironic that Mr. Black, a convicted but unrepentant fraudster, is now anointing himself as the arbiter of the merits of a lengthy fraud investigation.

As for being offended that a lowly corporal was the Affiant of a search warrant, well, from personal experience, this is the way that police agencies roll. The purpose of the Affiant is to gather all the information together, some from officers more senior than he, and present it in a legible manner so that a judge reading his Information would agree that there is reasonable grounds for him to authorize a search warrant. The corporal doesn't decide if the case he is working on will be ultimately successful, a senior judge has that job. He rarely gets input on the direction of the investigation. His supervisors do that. Although, it is perhaps not surprising that a lowly corporal is given this high-risk high-reward task, as when the investigation goes sideways and the search warrant is denied, the corporal becomes the sacrificial offering to the Gods of FacePalm, not his betters.

Care for another sour grape, Conrad Nero?

RossK said...

Thanks for that Mark--

Is it possible that the good Mr. Black is an highly selective historian when it comes to long-entrenched ways and means that may affect he and his?

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